Twitter Announces App Developer Requirements to Block Privacy Attack

Recently, Twitter has announced for new developer requirements, developed to oppose spam, privacy attack and try to manage conversations on the social media platform.

The firm claimed, they kicked 143,000 apps that disrupted its policies of the site between April and June, in this year. But they want to go further to change clarity and control over developers’ use of user information.

For this, now all of the new API requests will need to go through a new developer account application process in a bid to reduce “spammy and low-quality apps,” the firm said. This will eventually be expanded to all developers with existing application programming interface access, while not now Twitter couldn’t specify about the time.

The organization declared that it’s also limiting the number of apps that are registered by a single developer account to 10.

The firm also said that, in a further effort to defeat spam, Twitter is looking to introduce tighter controls on apps that create tweets, retweets, likes, followers and direct messages.

The firm claimed that these rate limits represent a significant decrease in the existing rate of POST activity allowed from a single app by default.

For example, from September only 10 apps will be allowed to post 300 that combined tweets and retweets per three hours and 15,000 direct messages per 24 hours.

The organization declared that as forwarding continue, as apps approach these rate limits, they will continue to proactively review and contact designers with instructions about how to request elevated access.

These ongoing reviews will help to avoid disruption for compliant developers, as well as help developers more immediately recognize and address any behaviors that are non-compliant with their company policies.

The final new action is a report a lousy app function in the Help Center that is developed to help users feedback when they spot abuses and miss-behave of Twitter’s policy.

Most prominently ahead of the 2016 presidential election, the moves can be seen as something of a response to criticism of the social media platform following long-running Russian tries to manipulate popular discourse on the site.

However, it will continue to be seen whether the measures go far enough, and will be enough to root out the malicious action on the platform.

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